Yoga or Resilience Training: Do We Have to Choose?

What are the main differences between yoga and resilience training? Would it be a good idea to do both, or are they a bad mix?
Around a year ago Debbie asked for a Yoga class as her birthday present. It was a great suggestion, and Yoga has helped her to cope with a stage in her life in which she has agreed to take responsibility for decisions about health care for her mother. Yoga worked for her and continues to be an important part of her life.
More recently a longstanding friend of mine suggested that I enroll in a beginner’s course in Yoga, and Debbie also urged that I take the course. For many years, I have been dealing with severe, chronic pain due to an arthritic spine that creates impingements on my spinal cord that result in chronic pain and problems with controlling how I walk.

I had just finished a very successful series of Physical Therapy interventions, so was interested in retaining the gains I had made through various forms of stretching and balancing.
Why did Debbie and I both reach out for help from another system instead of relying on the resilience techniques we already knew? Abraham Lincoln summarized one of the major reasons in a widely used quote about lawyers: “He who represents himself has a fool for a client.”
It’s helpful to get training from someone other than yourself. Distance provides a useful perspective.
In addition to that, though resilience training and Yoga superficially seem to have little in common, they are really very much alike. Both approaches use a wide range of techniques that enable you to know yourself at a deeper level and to soothe and calm yourself.
Yoga, as it is typically practiced in the United States, emphasizes working on changes of the body, and most resilience programs emphasize changes at the level of mind.
But change in the body results in change in the mind and change at the level of the mind results in change in the body.

For example, if you are getting agitated, slowing and deepening your breathing pattern tends to calm both your mind and your body.
Similarly, you can make yourself salivate by imagining sucking on a lemon and you can make your hands get warmer by imagining yourself at the beach lying on a big towel and picturing the sun warming your hands.
For quite a few years a significant body of research in scientific psychology has focused a lot of its efforts on conducting studies to determine whether ancient techniques work. For the most part, those techniques have passed the tests and been integrated into psychological methods of treatment.
So our view is that ancient disciplines from the Far East fit comfortably into recent, science-based resilience programs.

Share

Posted in resilience, Resilience Research, Resilience Training | Leave a comment

Distractions Play a Central Role in Producing the Benefits of Meditation

When you meditate, your experiences fall into two categories : 1. The object on which you intend to focus, and 2. Distractions.
Here we want to focus on distractions, particularly on where they come from and what you should do with them. At first we may be inclined to say that distractions are mere chaos of the mind. When we call them “chatter” we come close to implying that view of them.
If you take a step back and observe distractions, you can see that they are meaningful. In our ordinary, non-meditative life, they are calls to needed actions, attempts to solve problems that we face, strategies for fending off painful thoughts, etc.

During meditation, they are not allowed to take center stage.We keep our attention on the object of our meditation by gently turning away from the distractions. We do not wage an internal war against them. Instead we take a calm, passive attitude toward them, and let the distractions pass through, neither grasping them nor fighting them off.
What happens as you get better and better at letting thoughts that have usually driven you to action go unappeased is that the distraction loses its power over you, and you start remaining calm and centered instead of jumping to action.
You can see why meditation can make you calm, relaxed, and in control of your own actions.

Autogenic Discharge

One particular type of distraction calls for special attention. We call it “discharge”, a term taken from Autogenic Training, which can be observed over a wide range of techniques that involve calming the mind and body. For example, in Zen meditation it is called “Makyo”, and Zen masters inquire about it regularly with their students.
These discharges may include a wide range of symptoms such as dizziness, anxiety, headache, nausea, twitching, disturbing images, crying etc. In some ways their texture is similar to that of experiences people may have just before they go to sleep.
The best thing to do when you have these experiences is to gently turn your attention back to the object of your meditation. Generally, such experiences are self-limiting. If you stay with your meditative focus, they will fade away.

However, if they feel unbearably disturbing, stop meditating. It’s best not to try toughing out the experience.

A number of adjustments can be made in your meditation routine in order to minimize the occurrence of such highly disturbing experiences. Continue reading

Posted in Deep Relaxation, General Resilience Topic, Meditation, Resilience Training | Leave a comment

Clearing the Mind through Meditation

In this post we want to discuss mental changes that occur while and after meditation.

The type of meditation you do is a factor in determining what happens, but there are many commonalities shared by various types of meditation. Relaxation of mind and body are very basic ones. We discussed this relaxation of mind and body in our previous post, and we followed Herbert Benson’s lead in dubbing it “the relaxation response”.

Since Benson is a cardiologist, it should not be a surprise that he focused on physiological reactions relevant to how the heart and blood vessels react. Obviously these changes are important for all of us. But there are also important changes in the way our minds function when we meditate. And these changes impact how we view the world and how we feel and behave.

A very valuable change has to do with getting control of the constant chattering that goes on in our minds.

Limiting the chatter/background noise is essential to developing a mind clear enough to be able to make our perception of reality clear. In Yoga it is seen as a form of enlightenment and in the more scientific framework of Information Theory it is a matter of reducing our mental “noise” level enough to tell whether an input contains something meaningful, a “signal”, or is merely noise.

We see the ancient views from Yoga and the modern views from information theory as expressing basically the same concepts, though within different frameworks.

One of the classic accounts of meditation and its consequences is in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. The first line of the Yoga Sutras says that “Even-mindedness is Yoga”.  In this view, the mind can be likened to a pond that responds with waves when something is dropped into it. If the pond is calm, without waves, even dropping a small pebble into it will result in easily noted waves.

In the middle of a storm, the impact of that same pebble may be impossible to detect.

With meditation, our minds have increased clarity and a wider awareness than they had prior to meditating. This clarity and extensiveness of awareness goes beyond mere facts. After meditation, things you have passed by many times with little reaction may suddenly reveal their beauty and trigger a sense of awe in you.  So meditation also clarifies a more emotional aspect of what we experience.

Until the 1960s, Western science paid little attention to claims that healthy changes could result from meditation. Such claims were generally ignored or seen as hokum. In the early 1960s this easy dismissal was called into question, and research began to be published that confirmed some of the claims.

Interesting early work by a psychiatrist, Arthur Deikman, made a start in recognizing that our perceptions of many aspects of reality and our reactions to that reality are intensified and improved by meditation. He did a small study in which he got various colleagues to meditate on an ordinary blue vase. He simply asked the colleagues to sit in a room and keep their attention on the vase, putting aside distractions that came to mind.

Participants reported a wide range of reactions. Here is an illustration from an article written by Deikman describing a shift in perception of the vase that occurred quite generally:

   Sooner or later they experienced a shift to a deeper and more intense blue. “More vivid”   was a phrase they used frequently. Ss experienced the vase as becoming brighter while everything in their visual field became quite dark and indistinct. The adjective “luminous” was often applied to the vase, as if it were a source of light. For example, subject B, Session #6, “The vase was a hell of a lot bluer this time than it has been before . . . it was darker and more luminous at the same time.”

(When Deikman wrote this article, the term “Subject” or “S” was in general use when referring to volunteer participants in psychological experiments.)

If you do a search in Google Scholar for research on meditation today, you will find many confirmations of beneficial effects of meditation.

We will continue discussing changes due to meditation in our next post.

Share

Posted in General Resilience Topic, Meditation, Self-Understanding | Leave a comment

Why Not Put Meditation Through the Ultimate Test? Try It Out!

Prior to the 1960s claims about psychological and, especially physical improvements from mind training practices, got about as much serious attention as claims that the earth is actually flat.

A variety of influences encouraged those who are scientifically oriented to take a second look at these techniques. A very significant shift in readiness to take them seriously resulted from the work of Herbert Benson, a senior cardiologist at Harvard’s Medical School.

His work was presumably stimulated by popular demand, stemming from such things as the wildly popular Beatles’ taking up “Transcendental Meditation”, a very well packaged program centered on an ancient method of “Mantra Meditation”.

In a nutshell, Benson confirmed that mantra meditation induced something he called the “relaxation response”. This was a clear and simple label for a complex pattern of physiological replenishment responses along with corollary psychological feelings of calm and relaxation.

The mind-body pattern was familiar to the few people who understood how our nervous systems respond when we are distressed versus when we are comfortable and calm. The pattern was based on activity in a number of neural systems that can only be understood after much study of neurophysiology.

So his simply calling their effects as “the relaxation response” was pure genius. It focuses on a central benefit of controlling those neurophysiological and corollary psychological reactions without getting bogged down in technical details a person doesn’t need to know in order to get the systems under control.

(What is Mantra Meditation, and how can you learn how to do it? To get our answers to these questions, click here).

There are many types of meditation, and, in our experience, which one is seen as best seems to depend as much on the person trying to use it as on the meditation method itself.

Though mantra meditation is widely used, the current star of the show in our part of the world is mindfulness meditation. We have described how to engage in this practice here. The method we describe is an ancient one which has shown its usefulness over thousands of years.

We did a Google search to find out how well the effectiveness of mindfulness is supported by good research. For this kind of search, we use Google Scholar, which emphasizes research that has been reported in journals that are attentive to scientific standards of evidence. If you do an ordinary search, you may get as many sales pitches as scientific findings.

Continue reading

Posted in Mantra Meditation, Meditation, Mindfulness | Leave a comment

True Grit: a Remarkable Display of Resilience Guided by a Problem-Solving Attitude.

A recent article in the New Yorker was written by Jonathan Kalb, who, after a period of unexplained, severe headache woke up unable to smile on one side of his face. His face on that side just drooped, though he seemed to have normal responses on the other side. He had experienced an attack of  “Bell’s Palsy

This kind of functional loss is particularly disturbing because it can distort the facial expression of emotions. Thus, it can impair the ability to interact with others.

In Kalb’s case, the problem was increased by his role as a journalist, whose job called for him to interact normally and to form a kind of bond with strangers.

Those symptoms could even influence his ability to maintain a normal relationship with his immediate family.

What if his wife had been put off by his distorted smile? What if his son was embarrassed by him?

You can see that he had plummeted into a threat to his normal family relationships as well as his job and his social interactions in general.

Yet, his article focuses not on his woes, but instead on how he continued his life despite the problem that had haphazardly come his way. In other words, it focuses on the tactics he used to respond with resilience.

All of us have, at times, faced blows that made our lives harder. So we have something in common with Mr. Kalb. We can learn to improve our own resilience by seeing how people with troubling challenges like his can respond successfully.

So what did he do?

Continue reading

Posted in Adversity and Resilience, Resilience Skills | Leave a comment

The Role of Resilience in Making Failure a Stepping Stone to Success

They say that “dog bites man” is not worth reporting, but “man bites dog” is newsworthy.

Some of our blog posts started as cases of “man bites dog”.   After decades in which “positive thinking” was generally accepted, those posts took a close look at a growing view that “negativity may be good for you”.  But we ended up concluding that arguments for negativity commonly turn out to be based on mere matters of how you define negativity.

Upon close examination, at least some claims for negativity appear to be simple matters of treating realism as negative thinking. For example, thinking through obstacles that might get in the way of reaching a desired goal is considered negativity.

Continue reading

Posted in mental contrasting, Positivity/Negativity | Leave a comment

Anticipating Barriers as an Aspect of Positivity.

Should you do all in your power to block every negative thought from coming into your mind? Some people have argued that you cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought.

A common refrain in our society is “Be positive!” And there is a great deal of research supporting the idea that positivity is good for you. But can you really turn your mind from negative to positive on demand? Does that really help?

Convincing research indicates that pretending we are not distressed when we really are results in physiological responses that are known to be unhealthy, e.g. high blood pressure. This doesn’t happen if we get to think and talk about our feelings of distress, which inevitably involves letting negative thoughts and feelings enter your mind.

More than a few highly competent researchers have argued that there are actually benefits to negativity.

Continue reading

Posted in Expressing Feelings, General Resilience Topic, Harvard Grant Study, Positivity/Negativity | Leave a comment

Prepare for Your Later Life by Accumulating Skills and Habits of Resilience

Why should we invest in improving our resilience? Usually it is because we want to:

  • Avoid having painful, distressing reactions to potentialy jarring occurrences that come up in our lives, and instead to stay reasonably calm and cool in the face of such experiences.
  • Avoid ending up lastingly impaired by such experiences. That often quoted saying “Whatever doesn’t kill me makes me stronger” Is only true when permanent or long-term damage isn’t done. (Think of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.)
  • If we fail to avoid being impaired, minimize the damage by developing effective “work-arounds”, and thus maintain our quality of life.

Researchers have provided us with many studies that show striking positive effects of resilience. A remarkable example that comes to mind is research showing that optimism predicts  better outcomes of surgery, including recovery from a coronary bypass.

Still, studies in real life situations with large samples of real people that trace the effects of resilience over fairly long periods of time are rare. The work of Lydia Manning and her colleagues is one of the rare exceptions. Continue reading

Posted in Benefits of Resilience, General Resilience Topic, Resilience and Health | Leave a comment

Mental Contrasting: An Important Technique for Reaching Your Goals.

In this post we hope to show you the value of a technique called “mental contrasting”. We want to explain that concept, to cite evidence that mental contrasting really helps people change their habits to healthier and more productive ones, and to tell you what you need to know in order to use it yourself.

Continue reading

Posted in Adversity and Resilience, Attitudes of Resilience, Effective Resilience Training, General Resilience Topic, Habits, mental contrasting, Resilience Skills, Resilience Training | Leave a comment

Reconsidering Your Initial View of Stressful Situations Can Help You Respond with Greater Resilience.

Inevitably life confronts us with situations that are hard to handle. Sometimes our ability to handle them falls far short, and we are forced to go through a period in which we struggle and take some painful hits.

If we manage to get through such situations “in one piece”, we can be strengthened instead of being defeated.  When that happens, we have increased our resilience.

There are many different ways to come out on top of our struggles, or at least to keep them from utterly defeating us. If you take a quick trip through our 100+ posts in this blog, you will almost certainly find some that you can use as tools for getting through experiences you may encounter in the future.

A tool that has been occupying our attention lately is “Cognitive Reappraisal”.  It will be the central focus of this post.

What is cognitive reappraisal? It is a way to regulate our emotions. It calls on us to focus on finding alternative interpretations of what we are going through. This includes appraisals of the events that trigger our emotional reaction, the bodily responses that have been triggered, and of any other aspect of the total experience.

Continue reading

Posted in Adversity and Resilience, Cognitive Reappraisal, General Resilience Topic, Resilience Skills | Leave a comment